Morning Routine

Morning Routine

The beginning of the day is an opportunity to start fresh. We often say to ourselves, “I’ll start tomorrow.” We start our diets tomorrow, we start going to the gym tomorrow, we begin a new habit…tomorrow. Today is yesterday’s tomorrow and it can be the new beginning we are looking for. All those positive daily tasks we keep promising ourselves we will do, can begin today.

The best way to accomplish this is to create a morning routine.

Begin by writing down all the things you would like to do every single day, such as: meditate, go to the gym, read, walk, have coffee, journal, make your bed, drink water, walk your dog, paint, sit-ups, and so on.

Next, group similar tasks under one category such as exercise or personal growth.

Exercise: 

  • go to the gym
  • do sit-ups
  • walk

Then each day when you want to exercise, you choose what you will do.

After your list is simplified, prioritize the tasks in an order that makes sense. If you prefer to exercise early in the morning, then that task will appear at the beginning of your routine. Do you meditate as soon as you wake up? Then meditate will be listed before exercise. Keep adding each task until you have a routine that you can actually do each day. Here’s an example:

  1. Wake up with a smile.
  2. Drink water.
  3. Meditate
  4. Exercise – M, W, F Gym, T, Th Walk
  5. Journal

Now to start following your routine.

If you have a long list of tasks (I have 15 items on my morning routine), it will be overwhelming to do everything all at once and keep it up. Start with the first one or two things. Do them each day for a week or two. When you are easily waking up and accomplishing these tasks, add the next one. Eventually, these little tasks become positive habits and over time produce positive results.

Creating a morning routine is a helpful way to ensure that your day is off to a good start. And many good days, make a good month. And many good months, make a great year!!

Featured photo by Tyssul Patel on Unsplash.

Organizing Tip #13: Minimal Living

Organizing Tip #13: Minimal Living

Minimalism is a fairly new buzz word that describes a lifestyle of living with the bare minimum amount of personal possessions. It also encompasses being content and not desiring to have more. The idea is to live with just what you need or want and letting go of the rest.

Think about the feeling you have after you clean out your closet. You have three bags of clothes headed for Goodwill and what remains in the closet is now arranged perfectly with the clothes neatly facing the same direction. It is such a good feeling to keep only the things we need or want. Now imagine doing this to every part of your home – all the closets, drawers, and cabinets – all purged of the things that are not being used.

The opposite of living minimally is clutter. We keep everything! The more space we have, the more things we tend to store; it can become very overwhelming. 

Why purge? “Stuff” weighs us down, just like those extra ten pounds, which is where the phrase “less is more” starts to make sense. Having a few LESS cooking pots means it won’t be difficult to get out the pot you need, and so you cook MORE. Having LESS clothes means you can wear your favorites MORE often. Having LESS art supplies means you can focus MORE on the mediums you love.

Caution: minimalism doesn’t mean throwing everything away. But it does mean you want to get rid of things you rarely use or really don’t want. I suggest filling a box or bag of what you don’t want and put it in your car. Leave it there for a day or even a week just to make sure you didn’t hastily get rid of it. The experience is so freeing!

Shed those ten pounds, purge that closet, empty that bookshelf! Minimalism can mean just trimming down or a full blown diet – that’s up to you. Most importantly, it means you are making choices about how you want to live and helps you focus on what matters most to you.

Featured photo by Davide Cantelli on Unsplash.

Say NO to Good

Say NO to Good

Do you have a closet that you wish was just a little bit bigger? No matter how much you try to squeeze one more thing in it, you just can’t because it is full to the capacity.

Time works the same way. But because it isn’t tangible, we keep stuffing more and more in each day. In reality, time is limited and each day has a maximum of 24 hours. We must choose how we spend those hours and sometimes it is no easy task!

Living a life we love requires us to make choices. We have to say “no” to some things in order to make room for the better things. Only you can decide what is important to you and what is worthy of your time.

Spend some time looking at your calendar. If you are constantly on the go, running crazy, or never getting to do the fun things you want to, then it is time to say “no” to some good things, and “yes” to better things.

Featured photo by Andy Tootell on Unsplash.

Organizing Tip #12: Containers

Organizing Tip #12: Containers

Containers are my favorite thing in the world! I know every organizer out there understands this passion because there is just nothing as satisfying as finding the perfect container!

Imagine a pile of stuff, whether on a kitchen counter or a desktop or a bathroom vanity. Now imagine that same pile of stuff organized in a little container. So it is not having “stuff” that makes us a clutter bug; it is how that same stuff is displayed or organized.

When looking for the perfect container, the first thing I search for is functionality. Will this container work well for what I need? If you have to stand bottles up in it, then the container should have a smooth, flat bottom. I personally love square containers because there is no wasted space around it.

Then I look for the curb appeal. Does it look amazing? With so many choices out there, you CAN be picky! If you want to show off the contents, maybe a glass jar is perfect. For a more homey touch, maybe a natural basket is best.

Look around and see where your clutter is resting. Find the perfect container and presto . . . instant satisfaction!

Featured photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash.